Category Archives: Features

5 sweet things to try in San Francisco!

San Francisco has no shortage of great desserts and baked goods, so it can be quite an ordeal trying to plan where to go, especially if you’re pressed for time. I’m all for curated lists, so below are 5 suggestions if you’re looking to grab a sweet bite (or drink) in San Francisco!

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5 savory dishes to try in San Francisco

As much as I hate to admit this, I will concede that our neighbors up north do have a pretty respectable vibrant food scene. During the week of Christmas, a few college friends and I drove up to San Francisco and crashed at Rosalie’s family home, which is nestled in Outer Sunset.

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On the journey back home

Two Decembers ago, I returned to Burma for the third time, en route from neighboring Thailand, where my family had spent the bulk of our Christmas holiday.

To be honest, I struggle with writing about Burma. In some ways, I’ve been both blessed and burdened by my upbringing as an American of mixed Burmese and Chinese heritage. (My family is part of the overseas Chinese diaspora, with deep roots in Burma.)

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Throwback Thursday: Spending Winter Solstice in Hong Kong with the Chans

December 22 marks this year’s Winter Solstice. While it’s rarely more than a footnote on Western calendars, Winter Solstice (冬至), the shortest day of the year, is celebrated as a festival by many traditional Chinese families. It’s an occasion for family reunions and practically synonymous with a dessert dish called tangyuan, glutinous rice balls served in a sweetened syrup.

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An almsgiving feast in Yangon

My family’s trip to Burma this past January coincided with my aunt’s and uncle’s. In honor of my grandmother, who passed away 17 years ago, they arranged an almsgiving ceremony at the Tipitaka Monastery in the centre of Yangon. As I’ve said before, the community is interwoven into the fabric of Burmese life. Almsgiving ceremonies, which are really communal feasts, including a donation of alms to the monastery, are just another manifestation of the this generous spirit. And the lunch served was absolutely delicious.

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Rulebook: Eating out in Hong Kong

Some observations I made while dining out in Hong Kong. HK has an awesome food scene, but there were a few adjustments I definitely had to make. So without further ado, here are my top 5 rules for eating out in Hong Kong!
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How to eat your way thru LA in 8 hours

A few months ago, our good friend Janet flew back to Socal from Chicago. We picked her up at LAX around noon and immediately proceeded to do what we know best: eat (barring karaoke, of course).

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Was I in Chicago or in the middle of Burma?

Painting of a Burmese maiden hanging at their home.
Painting of a Burmese maiden hanging at their home.

I won’t lie. There’s a very special place in my heart for Burmese food, because it brings me home. The sound of chilis and garlic ground with a stone mortar and pestle, the aroma of caramelized onions, and the pungency of fermented fish sauce. And I had a obscene amount of it while visiting the Midwest last month.

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A road trip to Solvang

Just wanted to share some snapshots from a family road trip to Solvang. 🙂

Bustling business at Solvang Restaurant

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60 Hours in San Francisco – July 2013

Over the summer, my friends and I took a road trip up north to San Francisco, crashing at R’s home and tirelessly exploring the city in the 2.5 days we had. Despite the time crunch, we were able to hit up most of the places we had compiled on Google Docs, both hits and misses, and those in between. Good company, good eats, (reasonably) good weather. What more can you ask for?

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Happy Moon Festival!

Wishing everyone a Happy Mid-Autumn Festival! From our homes to yours, all of us at Oh My Food Coma would like to wish everyone a Happy Moon Festival, Mid-Autumn Festival, Chuseok, Tết Trung Thu and whatever other names you may know it by!

For the curious, I baked lesser known Teochew/Hokkien durian-flavored mooncakes, paired with a fresh brew of Ten Ren’s oolong tea (東方美人茶, labeled ‘Oriental Beauty tea’ in English). Unfortunately the cakes were a bit underbaked because the oven refused to cooperate with me…

In any case, enjoy the beautiful moon in its full glory before it begins waning again~

Peace,

Justin

Of funerals and death anniversaries: Burmese traditions and Chinese rites

This August, my grandma passed away, shortly after she turned 90. Despite how emotionally prepared we thought we were, it was still a bittersweet occasion.

With that said, I thought I would provide a glimpse into some traditions and rituals performed during Chinese Buddhist funeral services and Burmese death anniversaries. A major feature of many Chinese rites is food. Funeral services are no exception. However, in comparison to Taoist rites, Buddhist rites are very solemn affairs devoid of ostentation (i.e. no gold paper or hell note burning).

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What is the 626?

Recently, there has been a broader discussion about the communities that constitute “the 626,” a phrase that, we on OMFC have used on multiple occasions. I’m no etymologist, but the term in question seems to have come into vogue during my first 2 years in college, probably originating among high school students from my area.

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Of biryani and Burmese American Buddhists

Volunteers doling out plates of biryani

This past May, I had the privilege of photographing a once in a lifetime event, the sacred umbrella hoisting ceremony at the Progressive Buddhist Association (Thondrarama Brahma Vihara Monastery) in Azusa, a hillside community in Southern California. The monastery is perched on the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains and was once a ranch, teeming with horses.

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Htamane, a sticky Burmese snack

Just wanted to share a festival snack native to Burma. Htamane (ထမနဲ) is a snack made on the full moon festival of the 11th lunar month on the Burmese calendar (corresponding with late February).

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